From Griselda Gambaro, Argentina’s most widely recognized playwright, to such renowned performers as Brazil’s Denise Stoklos and Mexico’s Jesusa Rodríguez, these women are involved in some of Latin America’s most important aesthetic and political movements. Of varied racial and ethnic backgrounds, they come from across Latin America—Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Chile, Colombia, Puerto Rico, Peru, and Cuba.

  • In the context of the Chilean dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet (1973–90), this combination of the sensual and the playful constituted a biting commentary.
  • The sample includes 2,094 Hispanic adults who were members of Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel , an online survey panel that is recruited through national, random sampling of residential addresses.
  • Although some forms of corruption affect women more than men, and vice-a-versa, corruption doesn’t differentiate between genders.
  • Latin American feminism, which in this entry includes Caribbean feminism, is rooted in the social and political context defined by colonialism, the enslavement of African peoples, and the marginalization of Native peoples.

There are cases where governments have generated specific programs and projects for small women-owned businesses, but they are not articulated to productive policies because they are not included in the economic agenda . The political context and the visibility of women in politics also influence the business field. Women in political positions can be an example of leadership; some research revealed that there is a relationship between women’s political power and the rates of female entrepreneurship . Conversely, women’s political empowerment and entrepreneurship support may be disconnected or be less evident for women. This would have a lesser impact on female business behaviors (Reference Brush, Ali, Kelley https://temptacions.es/index.php/2023/01/30/mexican-relationships-society-5-advice-on-dating-a-mexican-girl/ and Greene Brush et al. 2017). Holy Terrors presents exemplary original work by fourteen of Latin America’s foremost contemporary women theatre and performance artists. Many of the pieces—including one-act plays, manifestos, and lyrics—appear in English for the first time.

Much of the discrimination experienced by women in the working environment is related to motherhood. In Latin America and the Caribbean, more than half of the economies in the region have no legislation that guarantees 14 weeks of paid maternity leave, which is regarded as the minimum time. “To believe in our potential as women is important and urgent in order to transform our society,’’ states Segura and this will be possible in countries that guarantee frameworks that protect women in various spheres, including in the working environment.

So, although mired in conflict, the Encuentros signaled the intimate ties between ideas regarding gender struggle and the political conditions that give rise to those ideas. In regard to the legal and regulatory framework, Latin America has made significant progress in the promotion of gender equity, and there has been steady progress in institutional reforms toward equity. Nevertheless, in relation to the rights related to women’s economic opportunities, the results are varied . In the region, there are laws that support nondiscrimination, workplace protections, and pregnant women’s rights, among others; however, these are not yet adequate. Despite the fact that there are various laws that protect women in these areas, there are still cultural practices that undermine these rights. It is recommended to conduct research and report the legal work to give greater security and development to women. Terjesen, Elam, and Brush state that the role of Latin American women entrepreneurs is increasingly important; however, their participation in the economy is limited due to family responsibilities.

The segmentation of the labor market shows that the majority of women are employed (62%), although this percentage is lower than for their male peers. Similarly, few women are employers (2.8%), while men almost double this percentage, and 18.5% are self-employed. Conversely, household service work (14.2%) and contributing family workers (2.2%) are represented by women . These data show the low female participation in the business world in Latin America . The purpose of this study is to develop an overview of the Latin American women-owned businesses environment in order to analyze the challenges that women entrepreneurs face. Since there is no database providing complete data for this study, the data was collected from several sources that included information of women-owned businesses in Latin American countries from 2010 to 2016. This work is based on documentary research, scientific papers, and secondary sources.

Other studies specify that it is insufficient to review only individual aspects to explain entrepreneurship, and we need to understand the problems influenced by the environment rather than by individual aspects. Aldrich, Rosen, and Woodward state that social structures affect the entrance of women into the business sector. Business environment factors can be economic, financial, legal, political, and sociocultural, and these are beyond the company’s control . The extent to which these structural dimensions affect women entrepreneurs depends on cultural norms in a given society .

ECLAC Seeks to Bring More Women into STEM, Close the Digital Gap and Eradicate Gender Cyberviolence

In addition to visibility, establishing a clear legal framework for reporting and prosecuting femicide is important to combatting the femicide epidemic. Legally distinguishing femicide from homicide allows for investigations to be conducted with a gender-based lens and for perpetrators of femicide to face distinct punishments. Nearly 1 in 10 (8.7%) Latinas working 27 hours or more a week are living below the poverty line – almost twice the rate of non-Hispanic white women (4.5%). At the same time, among all Latinos, poverty has declined markedly but it still remains high at 15.7%. The story is the same for Latino families headed by a single mom – the poverty rate today is half of what it was in the early 1980s, yet this rate (28.7%) still remains among the highest experienced by any major racial or ethnic group.

Abortion deserts: America’s new geography of access to care – mapped

I am president of the Inter-Parliamentary Union , the global organization of national parliaments. It was founded 130 years ago as the first multilateral political organization in the world, encouraging cooperation and dialogue https://latindate.org/ between all nations. As president, I direct the IPU activities, chair full meetings, and work for peace, democracy, human rights, gender equality, youth empowerment, and sustainable development through political dialogue, cooperation, and parliamentary actions. It is definitely worse in autocracies than in liberal democracies, which are thought to protect and advance those in need. In many countries, women are sexually extorted to get a job, access to health, education, or a social benefit. Corrupt police and corrupt judiciaries can also affect women and their children in lethal ways.

For the most part, researchers have concentrated on Caucasian girls and women from middle- to upper-class backgrounds, with few doctors even equipped with the language and questions to ask Latina sufferers. But even though researchers and physicians seem to overwhelmingly disregard Latinas in their work, eating disorders do not discriminate. A 2005studylooking at almost 2,000 Latinas ranging in age from 11 to 20 years old concluded that eating disorders are prevalent in all subgroups, illustrating that these illnesses cut across race, ethnicity, class and age. The content of this Model Protocol is based not only on technical elements—essential to understand the gendered dimension of the killings of women—but also on the experience and lessons learned by the people that participate in these cases day in and day out. The Latin American Model Protocol for the investigation of gender-related killings of women is a practical tool, designed to be applied by the people responsible for carrying out the investigation and prosecution of these acts.

Radical Women in Latin America

Young people took leadership in the streets, with the patient support of the “pioneers” from older generations. https://www.younity.one/the-servants-of-empire-sponsored-german-womens-colonization-in-southwest-africa-1896-1945/ New language became common sense, using gender-neutral terms in the highly gendered Spanish language, and specifically speaking of gestating persons, thanks to the struggle of non-binary people and trans men. The movement combined parliamentary lobbying with the autonomous practices of self-organized underground networks that had made abortion possible for many every year with massive and heterogeneous mobilizations in the street. Simultaneously, the Peruvian government is implementing long-term policies to break the cycle of violence for children who fall victim to domestic violence. Programs include aspecial unitthat protects the rights of children orphaned by the murder of their mother, or for survivors that were disabled by the act of violence against them.

Action should be taken to prevent digital transformation from worsening existing gender inequalities in the labor market. The labor force participation of women in Latin America and the Caribbean is low, and the regions gender gap is one of the widest in the world.

As previously noted in Section 1 , women’s fights for equality of this time were framed in terms of equitable access to social goods (e.g., education). The impact of this push was the transformation of the material lives of people living in poverty more generally.